How do documentaries from NatGeo and others get their amazing clips without startling the animals involved?

I’ve seen camera angles from a hundred or so feet above a pack of blue whales, but no telltale small waves as a result of animals scattering as a plane would fly overhead. Not to mention the absence of noise of whatever they’re using to get those shots.

And then they have the close up clips of bird courtships, in insane HD, and slow motion too. Literally, the camera must have been mere feet from the birds. But they don’t even notice.

Neither do the packs of lions, herds of buffalo, or those insane close-up shots of killer whales killing things. Or an animal giving birth. Or a shot of the animal sleeping, zoomed in really close.

How do they make these shots without scaring everything? That’s expensive and loud and big equipment! Not to mention, how do they find the perfect time to film two animals mating high in the trees where they can’t see them?

HOW are documentaries possible? It’s been tearing at my mind for forever! They must be ninjas or something, for Christ’s sake.

Was this Helpful?
Comments on "How do documentaries from NatGeo and others get their amazing clips without startling the animals involved?"